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Journalism in the Movies
by Matthew C. Ehrlich
University of Illinois Press, 2006
eISBN: 978-0-252-09108-7 | Cloth: 978-0-252-02934-9 | Paper: 978-0-252-07432-5
Library of Congress Classification PN1995.9.J6E38 2004
Dewey Decimal Classification 791.4360704

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK

From cynical portrayals like The Front Page to the nuanced complexity of All the President’s Men, and The Insider, movies about journalists and journalism have been a go-to film genre since the medium's early days. Often depicted as disrespectful, hard-drinking, scandal-mongering misfits, journalists also receive Hollywood's frequent respect as an essential part of American life. 


Matthew C. Ehrlich tells the story of how Hollywood has treated American journalism. Ehrlich argues that films have relentlessly played off the image of the journalist as someone who sees through lies and hypocrisy, sticks up for the little guy, and serves democracy. He also delves into the genre's always-evolving myths and dualisms to analyze the tensions—hero and oppressor, objectivity and subjectivity, truth and falsehood—that allow journalism films to examine conflicts in society at large.


See other books on: Ehrlich, Matthew C. | Film | Journalism | Journalists in motion pictures | Movies
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