The Disappearance of God: FIVE NINETEENTH-CENTURY WRITERS
by J. Hillis Miller
University of Illinois Press, 1963
Paper: 978-0-252-06910-9
Library of Congress Classification PR469.R4M5 2000
Dewey Decimal Classification 820.9382117

ABOUT THIS BOOK
ABOUT THIS BOOK
A landmark work of literary criticism by one of the foremost
interpreters of nineteenth-century England, The Disappearance of God confronts the consciousness of an absent (though perhaps still existent) God in the writings of Thomas De Quincey, Robert Browning, Emily Brontë, Matthew Arnold, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. J. Hillis Miller surveys the intellectual and material developments that conspired to cut man off from God--among other factors the city, developments within Christianity, subjectivism, and the emergence of the modern historical sense--and shows how each writer's body of work reflects a sustained response to the experience of God's disappearance.
 
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