What Is a Person?: AN ETHICAL EXPLORATION
by James W. Walters
University of Illinois Press, 1997
Cloth: 978-0-252-02278-4
Library of Congress Classification B828.5.W35 1997
Dewey Decimal Classification 126

ABOUT THIS BOOK
ABOUT THIS BOOK
      At a time when technology can sustain marginal life, it is ever more
        important to understand what constitutes a person. What are the medical,
        ethical, moral, mental, legal, and philosophical criteria that determine
        protectable human life?
      Following immediately on the publication of his highly praised book Choosing
        Who's to Live, James Walters addresses with depth and wisdom another
        ambitious and complicated matter: determining the nature of personhood.
        By providing a much-needed religious/philosophical context for the discussion--examining
        contemporary thinking on just what constitutes valuable life--Walters
        broadens his inquiry beyond the human to include other animals and deals
        with the phenomenon of anencephalic infants, those who are born without
        higher brains.
      Searching for a measurable and humane standard of personhood, Walters
        looks at the current definition of it and declares it inadequate--offering
        instead the idea of proximate personhood, with criteria for helping to
        determine which individuals possess a unique claim to life.
 

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